Schedule of Events

BONUS DAY

PW1: Reliability with an emphasis on condition monitoring: a blended workshop (This is a 1.5 day workshop)

Jason Tranter, Founder & CEO, Mobius Insitute

We are offering a unique workshop opportunity. If you register for the workshop you will have the option to view video presentations of topics (identified as Part One) in addition to the live presentation at IMVAC (Part Two). You do not need Part One before attending Part Two, but it will complete the picture and it will provide a great deal of knowledge on how to establish and operate a successful reliability improvement program.

There is no doubt that condition monitoring provides many benefits; reduced costs, improved safety, increased production, and more. But there is a great deal more that can be achieved. Many of the faults detected with condition monitoring are avoidable. Our goal should be to eliminate the root causes of those faults. But that is easier said than done. This workshop with the videos, will discuss the benefits of reliability improvement over condition monitoring, explain the differences in the strategy, and then explain, in detail, how to make the transition.

Part One (online):

Understanding the value of reliability improvement
Identifying the benefits for your business: where are your strengths and weaknesses, and what are weaknesses costing you
Auditing your current state (including benchmarking) and establishing KPIs
Proving the concept with pilot projects
Understanding which assets are most critical
How to sell reliability improvement to senior management
How to structure the reliability improvement program
How to change the culture, including:

  • Engaging senior management to achieve top-down drive
  • Engaging the “plant floor” to achieve bottom-up drive
  • Engaging the operators in the reliability improvement process and to improve operating practices

The principles of defect elimination: Design through to disposal
Using reliability engineering (Weibull and Pareto analysis) to identify opportunities for improvement
Breaking out of reactive maintenance and transitioning to optimized work and spares management
+ Identifying and removing waste
+ Benefits and execution of planning and scheduling
+ Managing spares and caring for spares
Continuous improvement:
+ Review the goals, plan
+ Benchmarking and KPI review
+ Communication and continual justification

Part Two (at IMVAC):

A quick review of the above topics
The core principles of failure modes, RCM and FMEA
Developing the asset criticality ranking
Developing an asset reliability strategy involving:
+ Interval based (PMs),
+ Condition based, and
+ Run-to-failure tasks
A review of the principles and technologies of condition-based maintenance:
+ P-F interval
+ Review of most common technologies: VA, IR, UT, OA, WPA, MCA, and more
+ Involving plant operators
Precision and proactive maintenance:
+ Precision shaft alignment, balancing, fastening lubrication
+ Electrical applications
Precision operation and standard operating procedures
Root cause failure analysis

Jason Tranter (BE Hons) has been involved with condition monitoring and vibration analysis since 1984. In 1986 Jason formed his Australian company, ARGO, which was heavily involved in vibration monitoring and systems development. In 1990 he sold that company and the “ALERT” product line to DLI Engineering in Seattle (now AzimaDLI). Jason was in charge of product development, and later in charge of vibration products. In 1996 Jason returned to Australia and for the next three years he developed the ExpertALERT (EAV), DCX data collector, and DCX Online products for DLI Engineering. In 1999 Jason formed Mobius and began the development of the iLearnInteractive series of computer-based products for vibration and alignment training and analysis, including iLearnVibration, iLearnAlignment and Interpreter. These products have been used by thousands of people in over 90 countries to learn and become certified. Mobius was awarded the Victorian Regional Exporter of the year and was a finalist in the Australian Export Awards for 2007 and 2008. In 2005 Jason formed the “Mobius Institute” for expanded distance learning and public courses, and courses that comply with ISO and ASNT standards for certification. Mobius has offices in Australia, the United States and Costa Rica, and training centers in over 40 countries. In 2010 Jason formed the Mobius Institute Board of Certification, a not-for-profit organization to make it possible for vibration analysts anywhere in the world to achieve certification per ISO 18436-1. Jason has delivered technical papers around the world, and has had articles published in numerous international magazines and journals.

PW1: Reliability with an emphasis on condition monitoring: a blended workshop (This is a 1.5 day workshop)

Jason Tranter, Founder & CEO, Mobius Insitute

We are offering a unique workshop opportunity. If you register for the workshop you will have the option to view video presentations of topics (identified as Part One) in addition to the live presentation at IMVAC (Part Two). You do not need Part One before attending Part Two, but it will complete the picture and it will provide a great deal of knowledge on how to establish and operate a successful reliability improvement program.

There is no doubt that condition monitoring provides many benefits; reduced costs, improved safety, increased production, and more. But there is a great deal more that can be achieved. Many of the faults detected with condition monitoring are avoidable. Our goal should be to eliminate the root causes of those faults. But that is easier said than done. This workshop with the videos, will discuss the benefits of reliability improvement over condition monitoring, explain the differences in the strategy, and then explain, in detail, how to make the transition.

Part One (online):

Understanding the value of reliability improvement
Identifying the benefits for your business: where are your strengths and weaknesses, and what are weaknesses costing you
Auditing your current state (including benchmarking) and establishing KPIs
Proving the concept with pilot projects
Understanding which assets are most critical
How to sell reliability improvement to senior management
How to structure the reliability improvement program
How to change the culture, including:

  • Engaging senior management to achieve top-down drive
  • Engaging the “plant floor” to achieve bottom-up drive
  • Engaging the operators in the reliability improvement process and to improve operating practices

The principles of defect elimination: Design through to disposal
Using reliability engineering (Weibull and Pareto analysis) to identify opportunities for improvement
Breaking out of reactive maintenance and transitioning to optimized work and spares management
+ Identifying and removing waste
+ Benefits and execution of planning and scheduling
+ Managing spares and caring for spares
Continuous improvement:
+ Review the goals, plan
+ Benchmarking and KPI review
+ Communication and continual justification

Part Two (at IMVAC):

A quick review of the above topics
The core principles of failure modes, RCM and FMEA
Developing the asset criticality ranking
Developing an asset reliability strategy involving:
+ Interval based (PMs),
+ Condition based, and
+ Run-to-failure tasks
A review of the principles and technologies of condition-based maintenance:
+ P-F interval
+ Review of most common technologies: VA, IR, UT, OA, WPA, MCA, and more
+ Involving plant operators
Precision and proactive maintenance:
+ Precision shaft alignment, balancing, fastening lubrication
+ Electrical applications
Precision operation and standard operating procedures
Root cause failure analysis

Jason Tranter (BE Hons) has been involved with condition monitoring and vibration analysis since 1984. In 1986 Jason formed his Australian company, ARGO, which was heavily involved in vibration monitoring and systems development. In 1990 he sold that company and the “ALERT” product line to DLI Engineering in Seattle (now AzimaDLI). Jason was in charge of product development, and later in charge of vibration products. In 1996 Jason returned to Australia and for the next three years he developed the ExpertALERT (EAV), DCX data collector, and DCX Online products for DLI Engineering. In 1999 Jason formed Mobius and began the development of the iLearnInteractive series of computer-based products for vibration and alignment training and analysis, including iLearnVibration, iLearnAlignment and Interpreter. These products have been used by thousands of people in over 90 countries to learn and become certified. Mobius was awarded the Victorian Regional Exporter of the year and was a finalist in the Australian Export Awards for 2007 and 2008. In 2005 Jason formed the “Mobius Institute” for expanded distance learning and public courses, and courses that comply with ISO and ASNT standards for certification. Mobius has offices in Australia, the United States and Costa Rica, and training centers in over 40 countries. In 2010 Jason formed the Mobius Institute Board of Certification, a not-for-profit organization to make it possible for vibration analysts anywhere in the world to achieve certification per ISO 18436-1. Jason has delivered technical papers around the world, and has had articles published in numerous international magazines and journals.

DAY 1

PW1: Reliability with an emphasis on condition monitoring: a blended workshop (This is a 1.5 day workshop)

Jason Tranter, Founder & CEO, Mobius Insitute

We are offering a unique workshop opportunity. If you register for the workshop you will have the option to view video presentations of topics (identified as Part One) in addition to the live presentation at IMVAC (Part Two). You do not need Part One before attending Part Two, but it will complete the picture and it will provide a great deal of knowledge on how to establish and operate a successful reliability improvement program.

There is no doubt that condition monitoring provides many benefits; reduced costs, improved safety, increased production, and more. But there is a great deal more that can be achieved. Many of the faults detected with condition monitoring are avoidable. Our goal should be to eliminate the root causes of those faults. But that is easier said than done. This workshop with the videos, will discuss the benefits of reliability improvement over condition monitoring, explain the differences in the strategy, and then explain, in detail, how to make the transition.

Part One (online):

Understanding the value of reliability improvement
Identifying the benefits for your business: where are your strengths and weaknesses, and what are weaknesses costing you
Auditing your current state (including benchmarking) and establishing KPIs
Proving the concept with pilot projects
Understanding which assets are most critical
How to sell reliability improvement to senior management
How to structure the reliability improvement program
How to change the culture, including:

  • Engaging senior management to achieve top-down drive
  • Engaging the “plant floor” to achieve bottom-up drive
  • Engaging the operators in the reliability improvement process and to improve operating practices

The principles of defect elimination: Design through to disposal
Using reliability engineering (Weibull and Pareto analysis) to identify opportunities for improvement
Breaking out of reactive maintenance and transitioning to optimized work and spares management
+ Identifying and removing waste
+ Benefits and execution of planning and scheduling
+ Managing spares and caring for spares
Continuous improvement:
+ Review the goals, plan
+ Benchmarking and KPI review
+ Communication and continual justification

Part Two (at IMVAC):

A quick review of the above topics
The core principles of failure modes, RCM and FMEA
Developing the asset criticality ranking
Developing an asset reliability strategy involving:
+ Interval based (PMs),
+ Condition based, and
+ Run-to-failure tasks
A review of the principles and technologies of condition-based maintenance:
+ P-F interval
+ Review of most common technologies: VA, IR, UT, OA, WPA, MCA, and more
+ Involving plant operators
Precision and proactive maintenance:
+ Precision shaft alignment, balancing, fastening lubrication
+ Electrical applications
Precision operation and standard operating procedures
Root cause failure analysis

Jason Tranter (BE Hons) has been involved with condition monitoring and vibration analysis since 1984. In 1986 Jason formed his Australian company, ARGO, which was heavily involved in vibration monitoring and systems development. In 1990 he sold that company and the “ALERT” product line to DLI Engineering in Seattle (now AzimaDLI). Jason was in charge of product development, and later in charge of vibration products. In 1996 Jason returned to Australia and for the next three years he developed the ExpertALERT (EAV), DCX data collector, and DCX Online products for DLI Engineering. In 1999 Jason formed Mobius and began the development of the iLearnInteractive series of computer-based products for vibration and alignment training and analysis, including iLearnVibration, iLearnAlignment and Interpreter. These products have been used by thousands of people in over 90 countries to learn and become certified. Mobius was awarded the Victorian Regional Exporter of the year and was a finalist in the Australian Export Awards for 2007 and 2008. In 2005 Jason formed the “Mobius Institute” for expanded distance learning and public courses, and courses that comply with ISO and ASNT standards for certification. Mobius has offices in Australia, the United States and Costa Rica, and training centers in over 40 countries. In 2010 Jason formed the Mobius Institute Board of Certification, a not-for-profit organization to make it possible for vibration analysts anywhere in the world to achieve certification per ISO 18436-1. Jason has delivered technical papers around the world, and has had articles published in numerous international magazines and journals.

WS1: Practical vibration analysis workshop: Interactive and challenging case studies (Full Day)

Scott Dow, Senior Instructor, Mobius Institute

The Practical Vibration Analysis workshop, presented by Scott Dow, will provide an opportunity to sharpen your diagnostic skills and strengthen your depth of knowledge. This is no ordinary conference workshop. You will be challenged. You will be made to think. And you will learn essential skills that all vibration analysts must have to confidently diagnose the trickiest fault conditions (that might otherwise leave you frustrated and even embarrassed). Rather than teaching you how to diagnose faults, you will actually try to diagnose faults yourself. You will either learn from your mistakes or gain confidence from your victories.

During the workshop you will be grouped in a small team of three vibration analysts and given access to a range of information and data. You can ask for additional information, and you can perform additional tests, but everything you do will cost “points”. The aim is for your team to solve each of the diagnostic challenges (while being coached by Scott) and “beat” the other teams.

Scott has years of experience in vibration analysis and training (he is a senior Mobius Institute instructor) and the case studies you will solve have been chosen to include a range of difficulties and applications. So whether you are Category I or Category IV, you will gain a lot from this workshop.

Unfortunately, space is strictly limited and the available places will be taken quickly, so please register soon.

Here are some testimonials from people have been through this experience previously (during our “Vibration Analyst Flight School” courses).

“Experience is the best teacher and this class provides the opportunity to gain experience and learn from mistakes without the pain of having to explain why you made those mistakes to upper management.”
Eugene Begley, Cat I

“There is nothing as valuable as learning from experience. Taking difficult problems, trying to solve them and then having someone walk you through the solution is priceless.”
Sheldon Bayles, Cat II

“This class was one of the best I’ve ever attended due to the practical, hands-on approach.”
Dan Fiscus, Cat III

A mechanical engineer by trade, Scott Dow has been working in the vibration world for over 25 years. During that time, he has worked extensively as a field analyst and as a trainer, teaching formal classes and also mentoring clients individually and in small groups. During the mid-90s, Scott developed an innovative training technique based on recreating interesting and educational case studies he had encountered. Students would receive the actual data to analyze and were free to request any field tests they thought would help them diagnose the problem, which eventually they would have to do in the form of a submitted report that was assessed in light of the actual (known) case fault(s). In practice, this method has proven to be highly successful, allowing students to bridge the divide between theory and successful application of that theory in identifying machinery faults. You can find this case study technique being used as an important part of Mobius’ new class on Time Waveform Analysis (TWA).

Scott currently owns his own business, CBM Consultants, with one of his primary duties being  the Principle Instructor for Mobius Institute North America. When he is not conducting Mobius classes, he continues to mentor both individuals and small groups with either on-site or remote support for database setup, building analysis skills, field testing and more.

AMWS2: How to conduct an effective bearing root cause failure analysis

Darren Kenworthy, SKF

This workshop will teach you how to read the various signs of stress, strain and wear on a bearing that has failed prematurely to determine and eliminate the root cause of the failure. You will also get to analyse actual failed bearings (noisy, heat, vibration, etc) and their components in order to develop objective and accurate reasoning as to what caused the bearing/components to operate for less time then expected.

Topics:
Load path patterns in bearings
RCFA methodology
ISO 15243 – bearing damage modes & classification
Hands-on analysis of sample bearing damages

AMWS3: Ultrasound, Artificial Intelligence, and Bearing Lubrication

Paul Klimuc, Technical and Customer Service Manager, SDT

In the times of the development of self driving cars and cell phones you can literally ask questions to and get guidance to a good restaurant, the nearest pharmacy or directions to a new location, the predictive maintenance world is lagging in assisting human beings to create better reliability for assets. To increase reliability of assets we need to reduce unscheduled downtime. One cause of unscheduled downtime is failed bearings. Statistics have shown that a very low percentage of bearings will achieve their predicted lifespan. It is also shown that over and under lubrication is a leading cause of premature bearing failure.

This presentation will show how the ultrasonic equipment can be used to assist lubrication technicians to grease bearings correctly. The hardware/software combination will guide technicians through the 5 milestones that will ensure correct lubrication.

  • Right lubrication. In the field the equipment will inform the operator which lubrication to use avoiding mixing greases and applying lubricants that will not meet the assets performance parameters.
  • Right location. The software uses a 6 node hierarchy tree to guide the operator to the correct location of the asset for lubrication.
  • Right interval. Information gained from using this system will allow users to step away from calendar based lubrication and begin condition based lubrication, allowing the asset to tell them how frequently to lubricate the bearing.
  • Right quantity. The ultrasonic equipment has an algorithm built into it that records not only baseline decibels but also monitors a stabilization period and after the stabilization takes another reading. A built-in algorithm will then give the operator guidance on whether to continue to lubricate or stop The software also recognizes the maximum recommended quantity of grease for the specific asset and will advise to stop lubricating when that quantity has been reached.
  • Right indicators. The system also supplies 4 condition indicators allowing operators to identify impacting on rotating equipment as well as stability of signal.

This presentation will include a live simulation on how the equipment response to different lubrication scenarios.

WS1: Practical vibration analysis workshop: Interactive and challenging case studies (Full Day)

Scott Dow, Senior Instructor, Mobius Institute

The Practical Vibration Analysis workshop, presented by Scott Dow, will provide an opportunity to sharpen your diagnostic skills and strengthen your depth of knowledge. This is no ordinary conference workshop. You will be challenged. You will be made to think. And you will learn essential skills that all vibration analysts must have to confidently diagnose the trickiest fault conditions (that might otherwise leave you frustrated and even embarrassed). Rather than teaching you how to diagnose faults, you will actually try to diagnose faults yourself. You will either learn from your mistakes or gain confidence from your victories.

During the workshop you will be grouped in a small team of three vibration analysts and given access to a range of information and data. You can ask for additional information, and you can perform additional tests, but everything you do will cost “points”. The aim is for your team to solve each of the diagnostic challenges (while being coached by Scott) and “beat” the other teams.

Scott has years of experience in vibration analysis and training (he is a senior Mobius Institute instructor) and the case studies you will solve have been chosen to include a range of difficulties and applications. So whether you are Category I or Category IV, you will gain a lot from this workshop.

Unfortunately, space is strictly limited and the available places will be taken quickly, so please register soon.

Here are some testimonials from people have been through this experience previously (during our “Vibration Analyst Flight School” courses).

“Experience is the best teacher and this class provides the opportunity to gain experience and learn from mistakes without the pain of having to explain why you made those mistakes to upper management.”
Eugene Begley, Cat I

“There is nothing as valuable as learning from experience. Taking difficult problems, trying to solve them and then having someone walk you through the solution is priceless.”
Sheldon Bayles, Cat II

“This class was one of the best I’ve ever attended due to the practical, hands-on approach.”
Dan Fiscus, Cat III

A mechanical engineer by trade, Scott Dow has been working in the vibration world for over 25 years. During that time, he has worked extensively as a field analyst and as a trainer, teaching formal classes and also mentoring clients individually and in small groups. During the mid-90s, Scott developed an innovative training technique based on recreating interesting and educational case studies he had encountered. Students would receive the actual data to analyze and were free to request any field tests they thought would help them diagnose the problem, which eventually they would have to do in the form of a submitted report that was assessed in light of the actual (known) case fault(s). In practice, this method has proven to be highly successful, allowing students to bridge the divide between theory and successful application of that theory in identifying machinery faults. You can find this case study technique being used as an important part of Mobius’ new class on Time Waveform Analysis (TWA).

Scott currently owns his own business, CBM Consultants, with one of his primary duties being  the Principle Instructor for Mobius Institute North America. When he is not conducting Mobius classes, he continues to mentor both individuals and small groups with either on-site or remote support for database setup, building analysis skills, field testing and more.

PMWS5: An introduction to flexible rotor balancing

Jason Tranter, Founder & CEO, Mobius Insitute

Flexible rotors behave differently to rigid rotors and are typically associated with the plant’s most critical assets so it is therefore critically important that you understand how these rotors should be balanced. The workshop will begin with a complete explanation of what it means to be a “flexible” rotor, and what the mode shapes look like. A quick recap of the key measurements will also be provided: phase measurements, orbit plots, Bode plots and polar plots. One of the key concepts (and the one that confuses most people) will be explained; phase lag and the relationship between the “high spot” and “heavy spot”. But rest assured that we will use all of our famous animations and simulations that will make all of these concepts easy to understand. With the fundamentals clearly understood, we will get into the balancing process itself. After a recap of the basic concepts of single & two-plane balancing, and static-couple balancing, we will dive deeper into modal balancing of flexible rotors.

 
In summary, the workshop will cover:
1. Flexible rotors critical speeds and mode shapes
2. Phase, orbits, Bode plots and polar plots
3. High spot/heavy spot (phase lead/lag)
4. Brief recap of static/couple unbalance and single/two plane balancing
5. Static-couple balancing
6. Modal balancing
7. The use of low and high-speed balancing machines

Jason Tranter (BE Hons) has been involved with condition monitoring and vibration analysis since 1984. In 1986 Jason formed his Australian company, ARGO, which was heavily involved in vibration monitoring and systems development. In 1990 he sold that company and the “ALERT” product line to DLI Engineering in Seattle (now AzimaDLI). Jason was in charge of product development, and later in charge of vibration products. In 1996 Jason returned to Australia and for the next three years he developed the ExpertALERT (EAV), DCX data collector, and DCX Online products for DLI Engineering. In 1999 Jason formed Mobius and began the development of the iLearnInteractive series of computer-based products for vibration and alignment training and analysis, including iLearnVibration, iLearnAlignment and Interpreter. These products have been used by thousands of people in over 90 countries to learn and become certified. Mobius was awarded the Victorian Regional Exporter of the year and was a finalist in the Australian Export Awards for 2007 and 2008. In 2005 Jason formed the “Mobius Institute” for expanded distance learning and public courses, and courses that comply with ISO and ASNT standards for certification. Mobius has offices in Australia, the United States and Costa Rica, and training centers in over 40 countries. In 2010 Jason formed the Mobius Institute Board of Certification, a not-for-profit organization to make it possible for vibration analysts anywhere in the world to achieve certification per ISO 18436-1. Jason has delivered technical papers around the world, and has had articles published in numerous international magazines and journals.

DAY 2

KN1: Keynote: - Aligning an Organization to Achieve Reliability Excellence

Paul Dufresne, CLS, CMRP, CMRT, CPMM, CEO, Reliability Playbook

Faulty business strategies (or their poor implementation) are often identified as the cause of a business organization not achieving its goals. But it’s really the people behind those strategies and their implementation that make or break the strategy.

The success of any organization depends on how well its members function as a team. Are the members passionate about what the organization does? Are they willing to “play the game” as a team? Organizational alignment is not accidental. Creating it requires open, multi-directional communication. It needs leaders to set clear goals for themselves and others. It requires leaders to give honest and timely feedback with the objective of enabling individuals to raise their own performance levels.

Management literature is over-flowing with leadership theories, models and styles. At the practical level, however, leadership is all about getting people to do what they need to in the best interests of the organization. Leaders must paint a picture of a more desirable future (the vision), and get people charged up and convinced that this future is worth the effort (buy-in) so that everyone in the organization constantly thinks about how best to get to the destination (alignment that drives innovation, service, etc.).

This discussion will outline the process followed that aligned an organization to achieve reliability excellence and that delivered superior results to its stakeholders.

Paul Dufresne has been president and CEO of Reliability Playbook since 2017, following 28 years of experience in maintenance and reliability roles in the U.S. Military and at Georgia Pacific, Trico Corporation and Koch Industries. As an enlisted soldier in the U.S. Army, Paul served six years of active duty and four years of National Guard duty. After completing his college education, Paul received his commission and served an additional four years of active duty as an officer in the Army’s Armor Branch. He spent the next several years in the corporate world helping design and implement predictive maintenance programs and serving in a variety of roles in training, maintenance management and reliability leadership. In 2013, he received the Senior VP Award for Reliability from GP.

Incorporating knowledge from his military and business careers, Paul uses a hands-on approach to help customers across the country and internationally develop and implement world class maintenance and reliability programs. Paul has experienced successful results throughout his career, including:

• Achieving and maintaining maintenance readiness of over 95 percent in his battalion while serving as maintenance officer.
• Rebuilding the lubrication and predictive maintenance program at a Georgia Pacific mill, achieving world class reliability standards and increasing uptime by 5 percent annually across all five paper machines within 18 months of starting.
• Writing GP’s lubrication standards in 2010 that are still in corporate-wide use today.
• Breaking every production record in the history of the business during his three years as corporate reliability and engineering manager in GP’s oriented strand board business.
• Creating and strengthening maintenance and reliability programs – achieving world class results – at Fortune 500 companies in nearly every industry from biopharmaceutical
plants to steel mills, refineries to paper mills, etc.
• Rebuilding a team and instituting process improvements at a corporate facility that led to a $60 million improvement in production.

Paul serves as chairman of the Society of Maintenance and Reliability Professionals Best Practices Committee. He is a member of the Society of Tribologist and Lubrication Engineers and the Industry Council for Machinery Lubrication. He holds credentials through STLE as Certified Lubrication Specialist (CLS); through SMRP as Certified Maintenance and Reliability Professional (CMRP) and Technician (CMRT); through the Association for Facilities Engineering as Certified Plant Maintenance Manager (CPMM); and through the Association of Asset Management Professionals as Certified Reliability Leader (CRL). Paul is certified in predictive maintenance technologies such as vibration analysis and thermography. He has written several articles and technical white papers and is a frequent presenter at industry conferences.

Paul is a Distinguished Military Graduate and has a bachelor’s degree in history with a minor in military science from the University of Central Florida. He and his wife, April, have four children.

STREAM 1

Case Study: Utilising advanced automated systems for the effective monitoring of draglines

Andy Stockings, Field Service Engineer, Schaeffler Australia Pty Ltd.

Hear about how we have successfully developed a proven online surveillance system for monitoring the condition of the hoist, drag, swing & propel machinery installed on dragline.
This application was particularly challenging due to the variable speed nature of the machinery being monitored.
The case study concentrates on how order analysis is utilised in the effective detection of defects in the monitored assets, and in this particular case was used to detect damaged gear teeth within the hoist gearbox of a dragline.
Takeaways
1) Practical use of order analysis & time waveform analysis to identify defects.
2) Implementation of a turn key solution on complex machinery.
3) Remote diagnostics using the cloud.

Salford University graduate with 2:1 in Mechanical Engineering. 20 years experience as engineer in development department at aerospace company manufacturing aircraft propeller systems. Emigrated to Australia in 2008, joining Schaeffler in 2009 as vibration analyst in Schaeffler’s online condition monitoring centre. Condition monitoring career started with analysing data from wind turbines after obtaining ISO CAT I & CAT II certification in 2010. Further experience gained when I took up Field Service Engineer role in 2015, performing offline route data collection and analysis with various customers in SA. Role in online centre expanded when I was involved with specifying, installing and commissioning new online systems.

STREAM 2

Case Study: Predictive Maintenance by performance analysis of plant: the lost art?

Ray Beebe, Sessional Lecture, Federation University

Much is written and said about the condition monitoring methods of vibration analysis, oil analysis, NDT methods, and electrical plant tests, but thermal performance analysis gets very little airplay in comparison. This is the analysis and monitoring of the physical performance of both rotating and non-rotating plant items as an indicator of their condition.  Performance analysis also often enables the optimum time to be found to schedule maintenance to restore lost performance.  Based on many years of experience in fossil fired steam power generation, this presentation demonstrates the application of performance analysis by describing how to obtain data and case studies on air compressors, steam turbines,   mechanical control system components, boilers and heat exchangers. (Pumps deserve their own session).
Takeaways
1.   How to measure temperature,  pressure and flow using expedients.
2.   How to use condition monitoring by performance analysis on a range of machines.
3.   Interest, enthusiasm and confidence to try in your own plant.

Ray had 28 years in power generation in Australia and the UK, on plant investigations and condition monitoring development and application for pumps, steam turbines, heat exchangers, boilers and associated plant. His first book MACHINE CONDITION MONITORING (ISBN 0 646 25088 4) was written during that time. In 1992, Ray joined Monash University at its Gippsland Campus (part of Federation University since 2014). He was a Senior Lecturer and Coordinator of the postgraduate distance learning programs in maintenance management and reliability engineering from 1996 until retiring in 2010. He continued teaching the condition monitoring subject up to 2016, and continues as adviser for some postgraduate projects. Ray has a passion for sharing what he learnt and has written over 80 papers for conferences with many in journals world-wide. His second book, PREDICTIVE MAINTENANCE OF PUMPS USING CONDITION MONITORING , (ISBN 1865174085), published by Elsevier, gained Ray the George Julius Medal of Engineers Australia for the best publication in mechanical engineering in 2004. His third book, published by reliabilityweb.com, is STEAM TURBINE PERFORMANCE AND CONDITION MONITORING (ISBN 978-0-9853619-8-3). Ray’s consulting activity has served over 35 customers in Australia and overseas. Ray is a Fellow of the Institution of Engineers, Australia; a Chartered Professional Engineer (retired) and a Lifetime Member of Asset Management Council.

STREAM 3

(90 min.) Lubrication Contamination Control

Frank Asamoah Asmah, Preventive Maintenance Officer, AngloGold Ashanti Iduapriem Mine

In Engineering, I have come to know that lubrication is a very vital factor though some artisans don’t take the delight to know and understand this lubrication concept. That is why I want to present to you the basics (what is Lubrication, The Purpose for lubrication, the benefits of lubrication). And the experiences. I can tell, many artisans lack knowledge in handling lubricant, with the knowledge and experiences, the presentation will talk about “how lubrication is done, and how to maintain it to avoid it from being contaminated, by knowing How lubrication contamination comes about, the common effect and issues of contamination in lubrication, and most important how to eliminate contamination in lubrication?
Knowledge is a tool that give us the power to solve every problem. So I believe this presentation can also give us the power we want over our machinery, our plants, and ourselves, I hope to be given the opportunity to present this small piece of knowledge I have on lubrication.
Takeaways
*How to maintain lubricate to avoid it from being contaminated,
*Knowing How lubrication contamination comes about with the common effect and issues of contamination in lubrication.
*Most important how to eliminate contamination in lubricate.

Frank Asamoah Asmah is a graduate with BSc. In Mechanical Engineering, attained from Kwame Nkrumah University of Technology. He has completed his first degree program, completed one-week Total lubrication training. He has completed a training safety in excavation at Global health and safety solution group (GHASS-G) making him a good licensed excavator operator, good excavator engineer and a safety officer. Frank is now working at AngloGold Ashanti Iduapriem mine for his national service program. He has a very good knowledge and skills in hydraulics and pneumatics. With his determination of becoming the best reliability engineer which has got him this far. He may not have much field working experience but he has a lot of research work done and still doing. This makes him gain a lot of knowledge. With an engineer’s heart, he wants to make all engineers to be the best in what they do which motivates and inspires him. You can reach out to him at asmahf20@yahoo.com or at Frankasamoahasmah@gmail.com.

STREAM 4

A roadmap strategy for implementing an effective reliability improvement initiative

Jason Tranter, Founder and CEO, Mobius Institute

Most maintenance, reliability, and production/operations people understand the value of reliable assets. And countless organizations have attempted to utilize condition monitoring and reliability improvement techniques to achieve reliable, dependable assets. But what percentage of those programs achieve the benefits they set out to achieve? How many of those programs are still active five years after their establishment? Sadly, the answer is precious few… Unfortunately, too many organizations either take a piecemeal approach, with a smattering of the “obvious elements” that are discussed at most conferences (CBM, RCM, PMO, RCA, etc.), or they have no real plan, or they fail to achieve any improvement in the “culture of reliability” – or all of the above. In this presentation, Jason will briefly recap why so many programs fail to achieve the desired benefits and then outline a step-by-step strategy for implementing the program. Every stage, step, and milestone has defined goals – skip them at your peril! In this 45-minute session, it will not be possible to explain every step (and very few of the milestones), but it will, at the very least, provide an opportunity to reflect on why your program may not be achieving its stated goals, and it will certainly provide a roadmap for those just getting started with a new reliability-improvement initiative.

Jason Tranter (BE Hons) has been involved with condition monitoring and vibration analysis since 1984. In 1986 Jason formed his Australian company, ARGO, which was heavily involved in vibration monitoring and systems development. In 1990 he sold that company and the “ALERT” product line to DLI Engineering in Seattle (now AzimaDLI). Jason was in charge of product development, and later in charge of vibration products. In 1996 Jason returned to Australia and for the next three years he developed the ExpertALERT (EAV), DCX data collector, and DCX Online products for DLI Engineering. In 1999 Jason formed Mobius and began the development of the iLearnInteractive series of computer-based products for vibration and alignment training and analysis, including iLearnVibration, iLearnAlignment and Interpreter. These products have been used by thousands of people in over 90 countries to learn and become certified. Mobius was awarded the Victorian Regional Exporter of the year and was a finalist in the Australian Export Awards for 2007 and 2008. In 2005 Jason formed the “Mobius Institute” for expanded distance learning and public courses, and courses that comply with ISO and ASNT standards for certification. Mobius has offices in Australia, the United States and Costa Rica, and training centers in over 40 countries. In 2010 Jason formed the Mobius Institute Board of Certification, a not-for-profit organization to make it possible for vibration analysts anywhere in the world to achieve certification per ISO 18436-1. Jason has delivered technical papers around the world, and has had articles published in numerous international magazines and journals.

STREAM 1

Case Study: Detection of root cause of unplanned plant shutdowns with online condition monitoring

Remi Delitte, Manager, I-Care

After several unplanned outages during a period of less than 45 days of the two redundant turbo-pumps in a big chemical plant in Belgium, Emerson and local reliability partner I-Care where contacted in order to propose a solution. Since these pumps are having a crucial impact on the production throughput of the plant, the case had to be handled with highest priority and precision. In order to make a suitable solution we advised to execute locally a root cause analysis test with the Emerson portable online analyzer. By the results of this analysis the root cause of the unplanned failures was uncovered. The combination of certain process circumstances and the product quality itself where causing at certain moments heavy cavitation with high vibrations, serious wear-out and integrity distortion at both pumps as result. Based on this analysis, the company decided to install a fixed online condition monitoring system of Emerson to have better insides and control of their process circumstances in order to avoid abnormal ware of their critical turbo-pumps.
Takeaways
– Benefits of online system
– How to solve cavitation problem on critical pumps?
– Concept of IoT

Here is my LinkedIn profile https://www.linkedin.com/in/remidelitte/

Currently Remi is focused on expanding the awareness about wireless vibration system capabilities and limitations outside European market.

STREAM 2

Case Study: A Low Risk Solution for Rotating Equipment Assets where Failure is a High Business Risk

Peter Todd, Reliability Engineer, Tensor Systems

Condition Monitoring is the most essential tool for reducing the risk of unexpected and high cost asset failures. Critical rotating equipment systems have always been a key target for condition monitoring and best practice implementations using portable vibration data collectors have been highly successful in reducing failure risk for industrial and mining plants. But there have always been examples where failures have been missed, especially where the rotating equipment systems are more complex. Often a vibration monitoring technician will find some unusual data measurements using their portable data collector system but are unable to make a confident diagnosis. An occasional missed failure is often not a major business issue for smaller and lower criticality assets but where the business risk from a missed failure is high, there is often a substantial business loss when failures occur. So, what is required to go to the next level of risk reduction for these high criticality assets? Over the last 15 years some businesses have gone to systems of online monitoring to replace data collector system but often they just end up with more of the same data they could have collected with a portable data collector and provide no more help making difficult diagnostic calls.
This presentation will use case studies to show how the Tensor Systems online condition monitoring approach achieves a substantially higher failure risk reduction for those critical and complex assets that your plant managers worry about.
Takeaways
-Learn how to assess the business risk from failure of your organisations rotating equipment
-Learn about the current worlds best practice for online vibration monitoring
-Learn about online condition monitoring delivered as a service.

Over 40 years experience in maintenance and reliability engineering, mostly in a heavy industry environment. This includes working 12 years for SIRF Roundtables as an Industrial Maintenance Roundtable Facilitator supporting the sharing of maintenance best practice across Australian industries. I have had a long involvement in Condition Monitoring and ran an annual Condition Monitoring, Lubrication and Reliability national conference in Australia for a number of years. Specialties: Knowledge in a broad range of Condition Monitoring and machine fault diagnostic techniques. Experienced in practical failure analysis and RCA. Experienced in a range of Reliability Engineering techniques.

STREAM 3

(90 min.) Lubrication Contamination Control

Frank Asamoah Asmah, Preventive Maintenance Officer, AngloGold Ashanti Iduapriem Mine

In Engineering, I have come to know that lubrication is a very vital factor though some artisans don’t take the delight to know and understand this lubrication concept. That is why I want to present to you the basics (what is Lubrication, The Purpose for lubrication, the benefits of lubrication). And the experiences. I can tell, many artisans lack knowledge in handling lubricant, with the knowledge and experiences, the presentation will talk about “how lubrication is done, and how to maintain it to avoid it from being contaminated, by knowing How lubrication contamination comes about, the common effect and issues of contamination in lubrication, and most important how to eliminate contamination in lubrication?
Knowledge is a tool that give us the power to solve every problem. So I believe this presentation can also give us the power we want over our machinery, our plants, and ourselves, I hope to be given the opportunity to present this small piece of knowledge I have on lubrication.
Takeaways
*How to maintain lubricate to avoid it from being contaminated,
*Knowing How lubrication contamination comes about with the common effect and issues of contamination in lubrication.
*Most important how to eliminate contamination in lubricate.

Frank Asamoah Asmah is a graduate with BSc. In Mechanical Engineering, attained from Kwame Nkrumah University of Technology. He has completed his first degree program, completed one-week Total lubrication training. He has completed a training safety in excavation at Global health and safety solution group (GHASS-G) making him a good licensed excavator operator, good excavator engineer and a safety officer. Frank is now working at AngloGold Ashanti Iduapriem mine for his national service program. He has a very good knowledge and skills in hydraulics and pneumatics. With his determination of becoming the best reliability engineer which has got him this far. He may not have much field working experience but he has a lot of research work done and still doing. This makes him gain a lot of knowledge. With an engineer’s heart, he wants to make all engineers to be the best in what they do which motivates and inspires him. You can reach out to him at asmahf20@yahoo.com or at Frankasamoahasmah@gmail.com.

STREAM 4

Case Study: A Reliability Journey – Defining Our Future!

Paul Dufresne, CLS, CMRP, CMRT, CPMM, President and CEO, Reliability Playbook

This case study will show the steps taken to align an organization with its organizational values and beliefs. In aligning these values our team have seen how our current and past actions have not been aligned to said beliefs and the results we have achieved in doing so.

This case study will also discuss the following:

  • Steps taken to align an organization to a common shared vision where one was missing.
  • Having team members with the right knowledge and virtues & talents
  • Execution of disciplined work processes using critical thinking
  • Effective decision rights where leadership and ownership of the program is visible
  • Having rewards tied to the right behavior, rewarding proactive vs. reactive behavior
  • Tools/Methods being discussed in this presentation will be:
    • Reliability & Statistical Analysis (Crow/AMSAA)
    • P-F Curve
    • Operator Basic Care
    • PdM Program Development & Implementation
  • Improvement results

Paul Dufresne has been president and CEO of Reliability Playbook since 2017, following 28 years of experience in maintenance and reliability roles in the U.S. Military and at Georgia Pacific, Trico Corporation and Koch Industries. As an enlisted soldier in the U.S. Army, Paul served six years of active duty and four years of National Guard duty. After completing his college education, Paul received his commission and served an additional four years of active duty as an officer in the Army’s Armor Branch. He spent the next several years in the corporate world helping design and implement predictive maintenance programs and serving in a variety of roles in training, maintenance management and reliability leadership. In 2013, he received the Senior VP Award for Reliability from GP.

Incorporating knowledge from his military and business careers, Paul uses a hands-on approach to help customers across the country and internationally develop and implement world class maintenance and reliability programs. Paul has experienced successful results throughout his career, including:

• Achieving and maintaining maintenance readiness of over 95 percent in his battalion while serving as maintenance officer.
• Rebuilding the lubrication and predictive maintenance program at a Georgia Pacific mill, achieving world class reliability standards and increasing uptime by 5 percent annually across all five paper machines within 18 months of starting.
• Writing GP’s lubrication standards in 2010 that are still in corporate-wide use today.
• Breaking every production record in the history of the business during his three years as corporate reliability and engineering manager in GP’s oriented strand board business.
• Creating and strengthening maintenance and reliability programs – achieving world class results – at Fortune 500 companies in nearly every industry from biopharmaceutical
plants to steel mills, refineries to paper mills, etc.
• Rebuilding a team and instituting process improvements at a corporate facility that led to a $60 million improvement in production.

Paul serves as chairman of the Society of Maintenance and Reliability Professionals Best Practices Committee. He is a member of the Society of Tribologist and Lubrication Engineers and the Industry Council for Machinery Lubrication. He holds credentials through STLE as Certified Lubrication Specialist (CLS); through SMRP as Certified Maintenance and Reliability Professional (CMRP) and Technician (CMRT); through the Association for Facilities Engineering as Certified Plant Maintenance Manager (CPMM); and through the Association of Asset Management Professionals as Certified Reliability Leader (CRL). Paul is certified in predictive maintenance technologies such as vibration analysis and thermography. He has written several articles and technical white papers and is a frequent presenter at industry conferences.

Paul is a Distinguished Military Graduate and has a bachelor’s degree in history with a minor in military science from the University of Central Florida. He and his wife, April, have four children.

STREAM 1

Case Study: How do expert systems influence the work of a vibration analyst in today’s environment?

Bruno Fouille, Asia Pacific Maintenance Division Manager, ACOEM

Expert systems have been available on the market for many years. What stopped people from using them properly is the amount of effort and information required to configure them. Therefore those expert systems were not really successfully used in the past. In an industrial environment of cost pressure, shrinking expertise in the plants, and increasing demands for availability and reliability of the machines, the time of the expert is very valuable and new more clever condition monitoring approaches are needed.
Therefore, the time needed to do the configuration of an auto diagnostic system has to be minimal and the automatic diagnosis should act as an exception monitoring system leading the analyst to the bad players in a plant.

This presentation will describe you an alternative for improving a condition monitoring program’s efficiency without requiring additional resources. We will demonstrate how to help expert users to focus on critical assets, and how to empower the maintenance staff with a computer aided reliable and automated diagnosis engine.
Through different real case-studies, the presenter will show you how to optimize the efficiency of your condition monitoring program thanks to an expert system with a confidence level indication.

Based in Kuala Lumpur since 2014, Mr Bruno FOUILLE is currently the Asia Pacific Maintenance Division Manager for ACOEM. In that capacity, he is responsible for the sales, network support and customer satisfaction for ACOEM condition monitoring range of products in ASIA PACIFIC. Based in Asia since 2002 (Kuala Lumpur and Beijing), Bruno has been involved in sales and service of reliability equipment for 19 years including vibration, infrared, precision alignment and oil analysis. Mr FOUILLE graduated in 1995 from the “ENSTA Bretagne”. A five-year degree in mechanical engineering. After graduation, he joined the French armed forces where he oversaw the maintenance of ships and diesel submarines for DCN: the French National military ship builder. He joined ACOEM in 1998 as a service engineer.

Vibration Stream

Case Study: HD Technology : following a bearing damage in a gearbox for 32 months

Tim Sundstrom, SPM Instrument

Following a bearing defect from stage 1 to stage 3 on a mine-hoist gearbox. The presentation will cover the basic concept of HD Technology and how the HD technology can extend the pre-warning time dramatically. A mine hoist is a mission critical application in underground mining and the challenge to measure bearing condition is the low RPM (52 RPM) and the limited measuring time window (120 seconds). An innovative tool to show information from several thousand spectrums in one picture will be demonstrated among other advanced tools.

Tim Sundström, born 1964 in Sweden, has a M.Sc. degree in Applied Physics and Electrical Engineering from Linköping University, Sweden. For over twenty years, he has been specializing in electronics development and has held managerial positions in the field since 1992. In 2001, he joined SPM Instrument as head of Research and Development, where he has been deeply involved in SPM HD development and field evaluations.

STREAM 3

How to separate unbalance from misalignment and reasons we get the M’s and W’s in the waveform and why we may not

Clyde, Volpe, Vibration Institute of Australia

Unbalance and misalignment are two common fault conditions, but they share similar symptoms, especially in the spectrum. This presentation will discuss why we see the vibration patterns that we commonly observe, and then look more closely at the time waveform. It is common to view an “M” or “W” shape in the waveform, but that is not always the case. This presentation will explain the reason why we see those patterns, and why sometimes we do not.

Clyde started his career in a paper mill and qualified as an electrical technician. He soon realised his passion was teaching though so in 1990 Clyde started the Vibration Institute of South Africa, this Institute soon became a leading training company there. In 2000 he moved to Australia and in 2003 started The Vibration Institute of Australia, he now runs courses throughout the world and is the Mobius agent for Australia and New Zealand. Further he has also done work in many industries helping set up their databases. Clyde has trained over 10000 people during his life, his focus is to change the ways companies think about Condition Monitoring, guiding them towards a more holistic idea of Reliability Maintenance. He has also given talks around the world.

STREAM 4

Asset criticality and its influence on effective equipment condition management

Bruce Lawrence, Principal Rotating Equipment Engineer, Origin

This presentation discusses how a well defined asset management strategy supports the development of physical asset maintenance needs and how through asset criticality assessment, the maintenance strategy approach can be optimised with the use of condition monitoring.
Asset criticality can be utilised to determine what equipment qualifies for a condition monitoring program; what condition monitoring technologies to deploy; what the condition monitoring requirements should be for data acquisition frequency; and most importantly how equipment condition severity translates into a weighted business risk, so that remediation actions are prioritised and translatable throughout all layers of your business.
Asset criticality can become the single alignment piece across your business within Operations, Maintenance and Reliability groups to ensure the optimal balance around maintenance, reliability and utilisation so that the assets return to business can be maximised while minimising business risk and optimising maintenance costs.
Takeaways
-How a well defined asset management strategy supports the development of physical asset maintenance needs;
-How through asset criticality assessment, the maintenance strategy approach can be optimised with the use of condition monitoring;
-How equipment condition severity translates into a weighted business risk, so that remediation actions are prioritised and translatable throughout all layers of your business.

Currently working with Origin and in the Oil & Gas and Power industries over his career; Bruce’s roles have been primarily hands-on technical & leading a technical team with a strong emphasis on developing and delivering practical technical solutions and reliability initiatives around rotating equipment and plant mechanical maintenance.

STREAM 1

Case Study: MVX Monitoring For Container Cranes

Stephen Read, Reliability Services Manager, SWB Plus Reliability Services

Case study of a defect detected and corrective action taken. Case study of online monitoring of three container cranes.
Using 3 x 32 channel and 3 x 16 channel systems to monitor each crane’s main hoist, boom lift and cross travel trolley.
Explain the use of the crane PLC systems that allows the MVX online units to collect and store data at the exact same machine operation condition to obtain accurate trending and spectral data of analysis and reporting.
Detailed study of the process information is required to determine the operational parameters for data acquisition.
Explain the difficulties in digital communication protocols across different companies and cloud server system setup.
Explain the complete solution from the PLC triggered inputs to the MVX units – Internet switches – cloud server – analysis – reports and customer server access.Case study of a defect detected and corrective action taken to potentially avoid a premature bearing failure.
to potentially avoid a premature bearing failure.
Takeaways
-Difficulties in setting up complex online monitoring systems.
-Complex monitoring of variable speed, variable load with reversible direction machines.
-Integration of PLC feed to the monitoring system to collect data at the same machine operating condition

Stephen started with condition monitoring at Olympic Dam Operations in South Australia. Progressed to Olympic Dam Operations Condition Monitoring Manager. Left Olympic Dam Operations and created my own condition monitoring company based in Adelaide called CMSA. Run and operated CMSA as a successful company with up to 35 employees until 2005 and sold CMSA to Schaeffler (FAG). Stayed on as manager to 2 1/2 years and then semi retired on a vineyard. Now working for Statewide Bearing since 2001 as the SWB Plus Reliability Services Manager.

STREAM 2

(20 min.) Case Study: Cryogenic Submersible Vertical Pump experiencing High Vibration

Ahmad Fadzli Ismail, Staff Engineer, Malaysia LNG Sdn. Bhd.

Three units of cryogenic submersible vertical pump for new LNG tank project underwent Factory Acceptance Test (FAT) at Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) shop test bench. Each of this pump equipped with four accelerometers installed at upper and lower bearing. These three pumps could not meet the vibration limit as per project specification. Two dominant peaks were at running frequency and vane pass frequency. These pumps later were dismantled for inspection and further checks. Re-balancing were done at rotor assembly, impeller and balanced drum which the only component not underwent component balancing prior assembly. Computed Flow Dynamic (CFD) analysis were also done to verify series of combination between impeller and diffuser vanes. The presentation will covers vibration plots, diagnostic done to determine the faults and action taken including improvement done to permanently resolve the high vibration issue.
Takeaways
1. Learning about Cyrogenic Submersible Vertical Pump a manufacturer standard pump
2. Challenges in getting the right vibration plot and conduct the diagnostic
3. Checks and engineering review to resolve the high vibration issue

Ahmad has 12 years experience in LNG plant maintenance of rotating equipment. Spent almost 3 years in project as Lead Rotating Equipment Engineer building world first on-shore Boil Off Gas Reliquefaction plant. Certified as Mobius Vibration Analyst Cat III and Machinery Lubrication Analyst (MLA II). Involvement in reliability study, major maintenance activities, condition monitoring, troubleshooting and root cause failure analysis of GE Frame Heavy Duty Gas Turbine, Siemens SGT-700 gas turbine, Mitsubishi steam turbines, Siemens-Dresser Rand centrifugal compressor, Nouvo Pignone Centrifugal and axial compressor, Instrument Air oil free screw and integral gear centrifugal compressor, API 610 pumps and Cryogenic submersible centrifugal pump. Heavily participate in organization capability development by conducting training and coaching session to junior and senior engineers.

STREAM 3

Case Study: Condition Monitoring & Precision Alignment - Energy Efficiency

Sven Fleischer, Area Sales Manager, Pruftechnik S.E.A. Pte Ltd

A case study(s) about the importance of good maintenance practice based on condition monitoring.
How precision alignment and vibration monitoring bring about energy efficiency and savings.
Vibration as effective maintenance Methodology  trend monitoring  diagnosis (bearing damage)  root cause analysis  precision laser alignment  more than just vibration, measure energy consumption improvement and calculate the cost savings per year. If time allows, showing with case study the importance to capture and analysis trends in your alignment data. Machines can be misaligned over short time, caused by weather or foundation.

STREAM 4

Selling Reliability to senior management

Jason Tranter, Founder and CEO, Mobius Institute

Reliability improvement programs can deliver tremendous benefits to all industry, but unless you have the complete support of senior management the program will not be successful. In fact, if you don’t have support, the program may never get started, and existing programs may suddenly be shut down. But how do you gain, and maintain, that support? Can you just provide examples of what other companies and industries have achieved? Can you explain “industry best practice” and what “world class” maintenance looks like? Can you explain the “common sense” benefits of reliability improvement? No, that will not work. In this presentation, Jason will explain:

  1. Very briefly, what the benefits are
  2. Why you need their support
  3. How to put a value on reliability based on the organization’s unique business situation
  4. How to quantify the value and present it as a business case
  5. How to prove the case with pilot projects
  6. And how to maintain the support on an on-going basis

Jason Tranter (BE Hons) has been involved with condition monitoring and vibration analysis since 1984. In 1986 Jason formed his Australian company, ARGO, which was heavily involved in vibration monitoring and systems development. In 1990 he sold that company and the “ALERT” product line to DLI Engineering in Seattle (now AzimaDLI). Jason was in charge of product development, and later in charge of vibration products. In 1996 Jason returned to Australia and for the next three years he developed the ExpertALERT (EAV), DCX data collector, and DCX Online products for DLI Engineering. In 1999 Jason formed Mobius and began the development of the iLearnInteractive series of computer-based products for vibration and alignment training and analysis, including iLearnVibration, iLearnAlignment and Interpreter. These products have been used by thousands of people in over 90 countries to learn and become certified. Mobius was awarded the Victorian Regional Exporter of the year and was a finalist in the Australian Export Awards for 2007 and 2008. In 2005 Jason formed the “Mobius Institute” for expanded distance learning and public courses, and courses that comply with ISO and ASNT standards for certification. Mobius has offices in Australia, the United States and Costa Rica, and training centers in over 40 countries. In 2010 Jason formed the Mobius Institute Board of Certification, a not-for-profit organization to make it possible for vibration analysts anywhere in the world to achieve certification per ISO 18436-1. Jason has delivered technical papers around the world, and has had articles published in numerous international magazines and journals.

(20 min.) Case Study: Trouble commissioning a 200kW fan

Peter Moncrieff, Manager, Vipac Engineers and Scientists

Following overhaul, the vibration levels of a 200kW fan increased by a factor of 7. This interactive case study details the diagnostic investigation to identify the cause of the vibration increase.
Takeaways
1. Unnecessary maintenance can create issues.
2. Vibration analysis should be undertaken during commissioning, even though equipment is new.
3. There are many potential causes of high run speed vibration.

Peter Moncrieff (BEng Mechatronics) has been consulting in vibration analysis for over 10 years. This has included routine condition monitoring, diagnostic investigations, in situ balancing of multi-plane rotors and commissioning of turbo-generators. He has a breadth of experience at various industrial sites, with a particular focus on power stations. His role now includes management of the Vipac Adelaide office, and mentoring junior staff.

STREAM 1

The Basics of Time Waveform Analysis

Scott Dow, Director of Training & Development, Mobius Institute

All vibration data begins as a digitized time sample – the “raw data”. Despite that, many analysts limit themselves by failing to develop a thorough understanding of the various aspects of the TW plot, aspects that range from proper setup (the technical details and how they relate to spectrum) to analysis (understanding what you are seeing) and diagnosis (relating it back to the machine). While the FFT is a powerful tool and the resulting spectrum remains our “go to” plot for analysis, the fact of the matter is that the FFT has weaknesses that make certain types of faults more difficult – even virtually impossible – to assess. Many of these are the very same faults that are easiest to analyze using the TW – once you understand it!
This presentation will begin by using case study examples comparing TW and spectral data for known faults that show you the necessity of utilizing the TW plot (or missing a severe fault) before a brief primer on understanding the TW setup, including the “2.56” relationship between the TW and spectrum settings and some practical tips to being successful.

STREAM 2

Case Study: Exciter Gearbox Reliability Improvement Program

Geoff Manley, General Manager, Lubrication Engineers Pty Ltd.

Exciter gearboxes are a known problem child for the mining and minerals processing industry. Short operational life is common and has become an accepted situation.  When operational conditions and process interruptions led to unsustainable failure rates, the major iron ore miner looked for options to solve the exciter gearbox issues.  Through a process of investigation, bearing trials and finally a lubricant change, the company are back in control of the gearbox failures.

This presentation will detail the history of this problem area, examine the Root Cause investigation, trial processes, the decision to move to a specialist lubricant and finally draw conclusions on the improvement program and what changing to a new lubricant delivered.
Takeaways
-Root cause analysis is critical to understanding the real reason for a system failure.
-Not all lubricants are created equal and in some scenario’s, speciality lubricants can make a significant difference to equipment operation.
-Some times the simple solution is the best.

Geoff Manley is a long term maintenance practitioner, having been involved in the effective management of lubrication for the past 26 years, firstly with Pall Corporation and now as the General Manager of Lubrication Engineers Pty Ltd. His industrial experience covers nearly all industries, including metals processing, hard and soft rock mining, minerals processing and power generation. As a well respected technical leader in the lubrication maintenance field, Geoff has provided training to 1,000’s of industry employees across the country. Geoff is ICML accredited both as a MLA 1/2 and an MLT 1/2 and has written a number of technical papers over the past 20 years.

STREAM 3

(20 min.) Case Study: SIMMONS FEED: Training > Certification > Pride > Lubrication Program Success > Recognition

Leslie Fish, Executive Director, ICML

A brief description of Simmons Feeds. I will discuss some of the challenges the plant encountered. Discuss the reason for consultation and benefits of training which led to certified practitioners.  Brief synopsis on the pride and ownership aspect that involved the team which led to the success of their lubrication program. There will be about 5 photos with a brief description of each. I will discuss the recognition that this plant received at the Reliable Plant conference along with winning the Battle Award as the end result. I will also discuss the team members and their contributions to the ownership culture necessary to maintain the program.
Takeaways
-Benefits of training
-Benefits of receiving certifications
-Identifying the low hanging fruit that is common for most companies and how they can improve their own situation

Leslie Fish is the Executive Director for International Council for Machinery Lubrication(ICML) and has extensive experience in testing and certification as a former Senior Executive in the trades education industry, which included Automotive, HVAC, Welding and Medical. Leslie is ICML’s representative to SMRP, PEMAC, MARCON and IMVAC and has presented and provided training to large groups within the industry. Having direct interaction with hands-on practitioners has confirmed for Leslie that ICML certifications can be personally rewarding to those in the trenches because of the recognition, sense of accomplishment and for the betterment of their careers.

STREAM 4

Case Study: Capturing the Knowledge of Aging Workforce

Paul Dufresne, CLS, CMRP, CMRT, CPMM, President and CEO, Reliability Playbook

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) forecasts that by 2016 one-third of the U.S. labor force will be in the 50-plus age category, compared with 27% in 2007. The percentage of retired Baby Boomers has nearly doubled since 2010, when the U.S. Census Bureau found that 10% of Baby Boomers were retired. Each industry will be affected by this shift in different ways, driven by current demographics, education trends and industry growth.
This case-study will discuss the steps taken by one facility to address this issue. We will discuss the steps taken and the process used to capture this knowledge and apply it back to the day-to-day operations to train the next generation.

Paul Dufresne has been president and CEO of Reliability Playbook since 2017, following 28 years of experience in maintenance and reliability roles in the U.S. Military and at Georgia Pacific, Trico Corporation and Koch Industries. As an enlisted soldier in the U.S. Army, Paul served six years of active duty and four years of National Guard duty. After completing his college education, Paul received his commission and served an additional four years of active duty as an officer in the Army’s Armor Branch. He spent the next several years in the corporate world helping design and implement predictive maintenance programs and serving in a variety of roles in training, maintenance management and reliability leadership. In 2013, he received the Senior VP Award for Reliability from GP.

Incorporating knowledge from his military and business careers, Paul uses a hands-on approach to help customers across the country and internationally develop and implement world class maintenance and reliability programs. Paul has experienced successful results throughout his career, including:

• Achieving and maintaining maintenance readiness of over 95 percent in his battalion while serving as maintenance officer.
• Rebuilding the lubrication and predictive maintenance program at a Georgia Pacific mill, achieving world class reliability standards and increasing uptime by 5 percent annually across all five paper machines within 18 months of starting.
• Writing GP’s lubrication standards in 2010 that are still in corporate-wide use today.
• Breaking every production record in the history of the business during his three years as corporate reliability and engineering manager in GP’s oriented strand board business.
• Creating and strengthening maintenance and reliability programs – achieving world class results – at Fortune 500 companies in nearly every industry from biopharmaceutical
plants to steel mills, refineries to paper mills, etc.
• Rebuilding a team and instituting process improvements at a corporate facility that led to a $60 million improvement in production.

Paul serves as chairman of the Society of Maintenance and Reliability Professionals Best Practices Committee. He is a member of the Society of Tribologist and Lubrication Engineers and the Industry Council for Machinery Lubrication. He holds credentials through STLE as Certified Lubrication Specialist (CLS); through SMRP as Certified Maintenance and Reliability Professional (CMRP) and Technician (CMRT); through the Association for Facilities Engineering as Certified Plant Maintenance Manager (CPMM); and through the Association of Asset Management Professionals as Certified Reliability Leader (CRL). Paul is certified in predictive maintenance technologies such as vibration analysis and thermography. He has written several articles and technical white papers and is a frequent presenter at industry conferences.

Paul is a Distinguished Military Graduate and has a bachelor’s degree in history with a minor in military science from the University of Central Florida. He and his wife, April, have four children.

(20 min.) Case Study: CO2 gas leakage detection at AGL Loy Yang power station

Peter Fanning, Condition Monitoring Engineer, AGL

A FLIR GF 343 infrared CO2 gas detection camera is used to detect leaks in the hydrogen system. This was a trial and error test as we had little documentation or familiarity with the hydrogen system on the generator. There were various leaks found on the system, many were found in locations which had been tested by conventional methods and passed as all clear.
The CM team have now developed a detailed check list for the upcoming unit 3 outage in May, with every flange, valve and potential leakage interface itemised so that the CM Team can be certain the whole system has been covered when searching for elusive leaks.
We will continue to create a detailed job procedure and eventually update the site Hydrogen leak management procedure (HSP021.)
In future we also wish to trial introduction of the CO2 trace gas into the hydrogen system whilst units are generating online in an effort to reduce hydrogen leakage as far as possible. We have been advised that only 2 – 3% concentration of CO2 is required which required the full stop.
Takeaways
-How to detect gas leakage
-Understand the strict protocol on hydrogen leakage limits
-Information on how to work in with operations

Peter Fanning I currently the condition monitoring engineer at AGL Loyyang power station in Latrobe valley. the power station is a 2200 Mw coal fired. My responsibility is to ensure that all cm activity’s are carried out in a prompt manner. These include vibration, lubrication, pump performance testing, ultrasonic thickness testing, noise surveys, thermography and being heavily involved in RCA investigations. I have had 39 years in both mines and power station.

STREAM 1

9 MW Boiler Feed Pump Way Past its Use By Date

Simon Hurricks, Predictive Maintenance Engineer, Genesis Energy Ltd

Huntly Power Station has four single reheat 250 MW turbo-alternators which are now at the end of their design life. Each boiler’s feed water is supplied by a single 9 MW steam turbine driven four stage cartridge style centrifugal pump running between 3000 and 5400 RPM. Typically, the cartridges last 8 to 12 years (40,000 to 50,000 hours) before internal wear causes the efficiency to drop off and the cartridges are replaced with a refurbished one (a rotable spare). The cartridge on unit 2 has now done 20 years (78,000 hours) but because Unit 2 was due to be de-commissioned in 2018 the cartridge has not been changed. Recent changes to load demands and other plant restrictions means that we are forced to continue to run this worn-out pump. This paper details the high vibration causing rapid bearing and seal deterioration, changes to balance response making balancing impossible, and the fight to keep this pump in service.

Simon Hurricks was born in the UK and Immigrated to New Zealand in 1957. Simon gained a NZ Certificate in mechanical engineering in 1974 and has been employed by Genesis Energy Ltd and its predecessors for 47 years and has been stationed at Huntly power station for 38 years as Predictive Maintenance engineer. Simon has specialised in vibration analysis and balancing for 41 years and has extensive experience in solving resonance issues and modal balancing of flexible shafts. Simon was treasurer and past president of the Vibrations Association of NZ and has presented papers at all of their 29 annual conferences. Simon has had articles published by both Bently Nevada and BK Vibro.

STREAM 2

(20 min.) Case Study: Vibration Analysis of Bearing Faults

Priyan Perera, Reliability Engineering Specialist, HVL Group

I have set up vibration analysis program for coal processing plants. One brand new 1400 tons/hr capacity plant, Condition Monitoring is being done for last 8 years after commissioning. Also another plant with the capacity of 20M/tons per year. Will share the experience of picking up bearing faults in CHPPs using vibration analysis. This presentation will include findings and will explain the related vibration data and parameter settings in picking up bearing faults of different machine components such as conveyor pulley bearings, pumps, gear boxes and screen exciter gear boxes. Depending on the nature of machines, vibration parameters and appropriate settings will be discussed with real examples/case studies.
​​​Once the defect found, further investigations have been done by doing internal inspection, bearing strip out and failure study.
Takeaways
– How to set up vibration settings and parameters to pick up bearing faults.
– Change of parameter settings depending on nature of difficult machines such as vibrating motors and gear boxes.
– Correlation of bearing defect nature with vibration data (waterfall pattern change, time waveform trends with case studies)

Priyan Perera holds a Bachelor’s degree in Mechanical Engineering, MBA, VA Cat IV certificate and Masters of Reliability and Maintenance Engineering from Monash University with 18 years of industrial Experience. Priyan has worked in Chevron lubricants as an Industrial consultant for lubrication and oil analysis doing lubrication related training programs for different industries. His past certifications include IR Level II, PG Dip (Electrical) and currently working as a Reliability Specialist in Hunter Valley, Australia involving in Integrated condition monitoring.

STREAM 3

Profitable Condition Monitoring

Geoff Soper, Manager, SPM Instrument

Condition Monitoring is an important cornerstone in the Industry 4.0 concept. The purpose of this presentation is to show how Condition Based Maintenance optimizes productivity and increases profitability in process industries. The presentation demonstrates the influence of CM on OEE and discusses KPIs that are essential for the continuous improvement of machine operation condition. The influence on ROI calculations is included in the summary.

Geoff Soper commenced his career with Philips Electrical Industries in the UK as an Instrument Maker and holds qualifications in engineering and business.In 1984 he moved to Sydney and was employed by a NDT Co. to implement its range of test, measuring and condition monitoring solutions throughout Australia and New Zealand. In 1994, after holding management roles primarily in IT services, he established and became the Managing Director of the apt Group (of Companies), to specifically address the growing need for on-line condition monitoring systemsOver the years he has been Involved in emerging and new condition monitoring technologies for both mechanical and electrical plant. After evaluating the superior qualities of HD Technology, to provide the very best pre-warning of bearing and gear faults, along with its ability to assist in process optimisation, in 2012, exclusive distribution for the complete SPM Instrument range was acquired by the apt Group, for the region. Geoff talks from many years of experience in the field of condition monitoring and keeps up-to-date with the latest advancements within the sector.

STREAM 4

Case Study: Implementation of a world class reliability program at a Tyre Plant

Rodney Fitzpatrick, Managing Director, Lubrication Engineers

The global engineering team of a multinational tyre company had established a Lubrication System Standard for all their manufacturing plants around the world. However, in South Africa their local lubricant supplier was unable to provide the service & support that was required to implement a best practice lubrication reliability program. Instead, LE South Africa was therefore authorized to work with the plant to devise & then implement a full program of correct lubricant storage & handling which included color coding, labels, dedicated filter carts as well as Xclude Desiccant Breathers and Xpel Oil Containers.

(20 min.) Case Study: Vibration monitoring for planetary gearbox in vertical axis coal mill

Bagus Catur Pamungkas, Senior Maintenance Engineer, PT Vale Indonesia

Vibration monitoring in one of the most important method to detect and diagnose faults in gearboxes. Planetary gearbox in vertical axis coal mill experienced high impact load and severe working condition that increase wear and shorten usage life. Existing vibration monitoring system based on overall vibration levels repeatedly causes false trips and inaccurate for in-depth analysis. To avoid costly downtime more accurate vibration monitoring is required.

This presentation will describe our strategy to improve vibration monitoring for planetary gearbox in vertical axis coal mill using spectrum analysis. Vibration analysis for planetary gearbox is more complicated than fixed shaft gearbox because planet gears mesh simultaneously with both the sun gear and the ring gear. Planetary gearbox consist of sun gear, planet gears and ring gear. A sun gear rotates around a fixed center, planet gears rotate and revolve around the center of the sun gear, and ring gear is typically stationary. Characteristic frequency associated with gear failure in planetary gearbox is calculated based on gear parameters and input speed. Characteristic frequency developed for all potential gear damage: single defect on sun-planet-ring gear tooth surface and distributed pitting on every sun-planet-ring gear tooth.
Takeaways
1. Overview of vibration monitoring in planetary gearbox
2. Application of spectrum analysis for planetary gearbox to detect gear fault
3. How to calculate characteristic frequency associated with planetary gear failure

Bagus Catur Pamungkas currently works as Senior Maintenance Engineer for Vale Indonesia. He has over 13 years experience in mechanical engineering and maintenance industries. He holds bachelor degree in mechanical engineering from Institute of Technology Bandung in Indonesia and also certified Project Management Professional from Project Management Institute.

DAY 3

KN2: The future of vibration monitoring and analysis - Will computers take your job?

Jason Tranter, Founder & CEO, Mobius Insitute

It is a brand-new age of intelligent, low-cost, wireless vibration monitoring (and the Industrial Internet of Things/IIoT) plus cloud-based software systems that utilize machine learning (predictive analytics, expert systems, artificial intelligence) to detect and diagnose fault conditions. So, what does that mean for operators of industrial plants, vibration monitoring companies, service providers, (vibration training companies), and vibration analysts across the world? Will the plant operators reach new levels of plant output and reduced costs? Will many of the traditional vibration companies go away? Will vibration analysts be replaced by computer systems? Or is it all hype? In this presentation, Jason will attempt to answer these questions and explain what the current approaches are to the automated measurement and analysis of vibration (and other process/condition data). 

STREAM 1

Case Study: My 30 Years Journey through Good and Bad Vibrations

Dana Lake, Reliability Analyst, SWB Plus Reliability Services

Presentation will provide an insight into barriers of implementing an effective CM programme on a mine site and ways to overcome it. It will also provide an interesting comparison of managing a CM program from a point of view of an on-site CM Engineer and an outsourced consultant, with pros and cons of both. Additionally, to add some spice, some very interesting Vibration Analysis case studies will be presented.
Takeaways
1. From effective CM programs presentation:
– How to get management support to on-site CM programs.
– How to be a good CM consultant – Expectations from the customer.
2. From case studies:
– The difference between bearing defects and bearing set-up issues.

Completed Master Degree in Precision Mechanical Engineering in Poland. Studied Reliability Engineering at Monash Uni. Started Condition Monitoring experience by implementing on-site CM program at BHP Billiton Olympic Dam mine site. Almost 30 years reliability related experience in various industries and various roles – Vibration Analysis, Implementation of both In-house and outsourced Condition Monitoring programs, Bearing Applications, Lubrication, Balancing, Alignment, Vibration Analysis Training. Honorary Secretary of Condition Monitoring Certification Board (within AINDT). Currently working at SWB Plus Reliability Services (part of Statewide Bearings company). Previously with Alstom MSc (4 years), Schaeffler Australia (12 years) and BHP Billiton Olympic Dam (10 years).

STREAM 2

Online Monitoring Solution for Slew Bearings – Fault Diagnosis and Prognosis

Farrukh Yaqub, Manager - Remote Monitoring Solutions, SKF Australia Pty

Condition monitoring of large size slew bearings on the heavy mining equipment, e.g., stacker, reclaimer, ship loaders etc., poses a big challenge as these machines run on a very low speed. Also, the varied operating conditions from the operation make it further difficult to capture repeatable and reliable data. Effective reliability and condition monitoring practices on these assets not only increase the availability and improve safety but also enhance the consistency of the data. This paper provides online condition monitoring solution for large size slew bearing. In the proposed solution, the data acquisition is optimized by mitigating the impact of machine dynamics, i.e., speed, slew angle and load distribution. The discussion not only covers the design aspects of the system but also presents technical cases from our past experiences.

F. Yaqub has done PhD in condition monitoring from Monash University, Australia. He did MS (2009) and BS (2007) in Electrical Engineering. Currently, Mr. Yaqub is working with SKF Australia as Business Manager – Remote Monitoring Solutions. His key area of research is remote machine health monitoring and advanced signal processing. He has published over 25 peer-reviewed research papers as first author in renowned international conferences and journals.

STREAM 3

(90 min.) What You Should Know When Requesting Workshop Dynamic Balancing

John Manson, Managing Director, Machinery Vibration Specialists Aust P/L

Most engineering departments in the industry know that rotor balancing is important but few have the understanding
of defining what they require the balancing shop to do. They rely on the balancing shop operators to guess what they should do with their rotor.
In this Presentation You will Learn ———–
1. The fundamentals of rotor unbalance.
Causes and symptoms of unbalance.
Units and forces of unbalance.
The 4x ISO defined types of unbalance.
Correction methods, single plane, two plane or multi plane balancing.
Rotor types, rigid or flexible.
2. Balancing Machines design
“Soft Bearing Machines”
“Semi-Hard Bearing Machines”
“Hard Bearing Machines”
Calibration Concerns.
3. Rotor Balancing Tolerances
ISO 21940-2003 Balance Trolerances of Rigid Rotors
API Balance Tolerances
USA Miltiary Balance Tolerances.
4. Clearly Define Balancing Requirements.
Define rotor weight and maximum operating speed.
Define correction weight method and position.
Define additions to the rotor such as half keys, pulleys or couplings.
Define tolerance required at support bearings or correction  planes.
5. Request a Written Report.
Summary of work performed on rotor.
Unbalance levels before and after corrections.
Achieved tolerance for each plane compared with standard tolerance.

I first started in the balancing machine business in the early 1970s with IRD Mechanalysis Inc. and to this day I still work with IRD Balancing and another manufacturer from Italy, CEMB S.p.A. who manufacture horizontal and vertical balancing machines. To support the supply of these machines I conduct regular training courses throughout Australia and New Zealand. IRD Mechanalysis Inc. were also one of the pioneers in the measurement of vibration on plant machinery and were the first to introduce hand held data collectors using FFT analysis techniques and Windows based software. After the take-over and demise of IRD Mechanalysis in the mid 1990s we became associated with another dedicated vibration, Swedish, company SPM Instrument AB who made their name developing “Shock Pulse” measurements for the early detection of bearing faults. With this company we have supplied many of their portable analysers and On-Line monitoring systems especially in the water and road/rail tunnel industry. To supply these services I have my own company, Machinery Vibration Specialists Australia Pty. Ltd., which has been in operation since 1979 and is located in Sydney NSW.

STREAM 1

Controlling vibration with tuned mass dampers

Jason Tranter, Founder and CEO, Mobius Institute Simon Hurricks, Predictive Maintenance Engineer, Genesis Energy Ltd.

Did you know that you can add a metal bar (with a weight on the end) to a machine that is experiencing high vibration and that vibration will be reduced, potentially dramatically? Yes, it is true! “Tuned absorbers” and “tuned mass dampers” are widely used in a variety of applications, from multi-story buildings to small industrial pumps, to minimize vibration. It is a tool that every vibration analyst should be aware of as it can help solve problems that you may struggle to solve otherwise. In this presentation, Jason Tranter will explain the basic principles (and present a couple of basic case studies), and Simon Hurricks will present a case study that you will hardly believe, involving a tuned absorber on a steam turbine-generator.

Jason Tranter (BE Hons) has been involved with condition monitoring and vibration analysis since 1984. In 1986 Jason formed his Australian company, ARGO, which was heavily involved in vibration monitoring and systems development. In 1990 he sold that company and the “ALERT” product line to DLI Engineering in Seattle (now AzimaDLI). Jason was in charge of product development, and later in charge of vibration products. In 1996 Jason returned to Australia and for the next three years he developed the ExpertALERT (EAV), DCX data collector, and DCX Online products for DLI Engineering. In 1999 Jason formed Mobius and began the development of the iLearnInteractive series of computer-based products for vibration and alignment training and analysis, including iLearnVibration, iLearnAlignment and Interpreter. These products have been used by thousands of people in over 90 countries to learn and become certified. Mobius was awarded the Victorian Regional Exporter of the year and was a finalist in the Australian Export Awards for 2007 and 2008. In 2005 Jason formed the “Mobius Institute” for expanded distance learning and public courses, and courses that comply with ISO and ASNT standards for certification. Mobius has offices in Australia, the United States and Costa Rica, and training centers in over 40 countries. In 2010 Jason formed the Mobius Institute Board of Certification, a not-for-profit organization to make it possible for vibration analysts anywhere in the world to achieve certification per ISO 18436-1. Jason has delivered technical papers around the world, and has had articles published in numerous international magazines and journals.

STREAM 2

Realising the full benefits of airborne and structure borne ultrasound

Ian Ware, Managing Director, Ultra-Tek Pty Ltd.

Much more than just leak detection, ultrasound has numerous mechanical and electrical applications driven by the advances in instrument design. Applications traverse ALL industry sectors so the benefits of the technology can be realised by every company to deliver rapid return on investment by eliminating energy wastage, optimising lubrication regimes, positively impacting machine reliability and increased safety around electrical inspections.
Takeaways
1) What is ultrasound and how can it be applied in my facility
2) Ease of use of the technology to deliver a rapid ROI
3) Using ultrasound as a front line safety mechanism

Ian’s primary areas of expertise are in the key facets of asset management, reliability and maintenance Engineering. Special interests are the development of condition based maintenance strategies with a passion for Ultrasonics. With over 25 years’ experience across mining, oil & gas, petrochemical, power generation, food and beverage, metals processing, pharmaceutical, manufacturing and defence industry verticals, he brings a diverse and practical approach to his clients. He secured the world leading UE Systems product line under his own company, Ultra-Tek, in 2010 as their master distributer and offers sales, service, calibration and technical support for UE Systems customers with a heavy emphasis on training. With an enthusiastic presentation style, he creates a great learning environment and now has a loyal client base of some 200 customers. Qualifications Ian has a Bachelor of Engineering in Production Engineering, is a certified Maintenance & Reliability Professional, a certified Change Management facilitator and a Level II Certified Ultrasound Instructor. Ian is also active with Standards Australia on ME087 as an industry expert on the adoption and implementation of ISO 18436 (Parts 6 & 8) Ultrasound Standards. Professional Experience His professional experience spans 27 years. During this period, he has worked for IRD Mechanalysis, Entek, Shell, PALL Corporation and GPAllied before starting Ultra-Tek in early 2010. Ian is based out of the Gold Coast of Australia.

STREAM 3

(90 min.) What You Should Know When Requesting Workshop Dynamic Balancing

John Manson, Managing Director, Machinery Vibration Specialists Aust P/L

Most engineering departments in the industry know that rotor balancing is important but few have the understanding
of defining what they require the balancing shop to do. They rely on the balancing shop operators to guess what they should do with their rotor.
In this Presentation You will Learn ———–
1. The fundamentals of rotor unbalance.
Causes and symptoms of unbalance.
Units and forces of unbalance.
The 4x ISO defined types of unbalance.
Correction methods, single plane, two plane or multi plane balancing.
Rotor types, rigid or flexible.
2. Balancing Machines design
“Soft Bearing Machines”
“Semi-Hard Bearing Machines”
“Hard Bearing Machines”
Calibration Concerns.
3. Rotor Balancing Tolerances
ISO 21940-2003 Balance Trolerances of Rigid Rotors
API Balance Tolerances
USA Miltiary Balance Tolerances.
4. Clearly Define Balancing Requirements.
Define rotor weight and maximum operating speed.
Define correction weight method and position.
Define additions to the rotor such as half keys, pulleys or couplings.
Define tolerance required at support bearings or correction  planes.
5. Request a Written Report.
Summary of work performed on rotor.
Unbalance levels before and after corrections.
Achieved tolerance for each plane compared with standard tolerance.

I first started in the balancing machine business in the early 1970s with IRD Mechanalysis Inc. and to this day I still work with IRD Balancing and another manufacturer from Italy, CEMB S.p.A. who manufacture horizontal and vertical balancing machines. To support the supply of these machines I conduct regular training courses throughout Australia and New Zealand. IRD Mechanalysis Inc. were also one of the pioneers in the measurement of vibration on plant machinery and were the first to introduce hand held data collectors using FFT analysis techniques and Windows based software. After the take-over and demise of IRD Mechanalysis in the mid 1990s we became associated with another dedicated vibration, Swedish, company SPM Instrument AB who made their name developing “Shock Pulse” measurements for the early detection of bearing faults. With this company we have supplied many of their portable analysers and On-Line monitoring systems especially in the water and road/rail tunnel industry. To supply these services I have my own company, Machinery Vibration Specialists Australia Pty. Ltd., which has been in operation since 1979 and is located in Sydney NSW.

STREAM 1

Case Study: How to modify pumps and optimise overhaul to save energy

Ray Beebe, Sessional Lecture, Federation University

After motors, centrifugal pumps are arguably the most common machine in power and process industry, and major consumers of energy. Sometimes, pumps are oversized and throttled in service, wasting energy. Ray shows how pumps can be modified to reduce waste energy. If deterioration in performance of a pump causes a drop in plant production, overhaul is usually readily justified. When the effect is only to increase power consumption, the time to overhaul for minimum cost can be calculated from condition monitoring test results. Some basic condition monitoring tests for pumps are described.
Takeaways
1.  How to identify oversized  pumps.
2.  How to estimate power savings from modifying a pump.
3.  How to use condition monitoring to find the optimum time to overhaul a pump.

Ray had 28 years in power generation in Australia and the UK, on plant investigations and condition monitoring development and application for pumps, steam turbines, heat exchangers, boilers and associated plant. His first book MACHINE CONDITION MONITORING (ISBN 0 646 25088 4) was written during that time. In 1992, Ray joined Monash University at its Gippsland Campus (part of Federation University since 2014). He was a Senior Lecturer and Co-ordinator of the postgraduate distance learning programs in maintenance management and reliability engineering from 1996 until retiring in 2010. He continued teaching the condition monitoring subject up to 2016, and continues as adviser for some postgraduate projects. Ray has a passion for sharing what he learnt and has written over 80 papers for conferences with many in journals world-wide. His second book, PREDICTIVE MAINTENANCE OF PUMPS USING CONDITION MONITORING , (ISBN 1865174085), published by Elsevier, gained Ray the George Julius Medal of Engineers Australia for the best publication in mechanical engineering in 2004. His third book, published by reliabilityweb.com, is STEAM TURBINE PERFORMANCE AND CONDITION MONITORING (ISBN 978-0-9853619-8-3). Ray’s consulting activity has served over 35 customers in Australia and overseas. Ray is a Fellow of the Institution of Engineers, Australia; a Chartered Professional Engineer (retired) and a Lifetime Member of Asset Management Council.

STREAM 2

The Importance of Combining Vibration Analysis and Reliability Engineering into a Combined Reliability Maintenance Drive, and how this can be done

Clyde Volpe, Director, Vibration Institute of Australia

Vibration analysis is an important tool to help improve reliability in the plant; reducing unplanned downtime, reducing secondary damage, reducing the need for large spares inventory, reducing maintenance costs overall. But there is much more we can do to improve reliability. This presentation will discuss the bigger picture of reliability improvement and discuss all the ways the reliability engineer can have an impact on reliability (and thus uptime, capacity, safety, costs, and more), especially in association with the condition monitoring team.

Clyde started his career in a paper mill and qualified as an electrical technician. He soon realised his passion was teaching though so in 1990 Clyde started the Vibration Institute of South Africa, this Institute soon became a leading training company there. In 2000 he moved to Australia and in 2003 started The Vibration Institute of Australia, he now runs courses throughout the world and is the Mobius agent for Australia and New Zealand. Further he has also done work in many industries helping set up their databases. Clyde has trained over 10000 people during his life, his focus is to change the ways companies think about Condition Monitoring, guiding them towards a more holistic idea of Reliability Maintenance. He has also given talks around the world.

STREAM 3

Condition Monitoring of Reciprocating Compressors in Oil and Gas

Amir Basyouni, Head of Condition Monitoring, Amoc Refinery

Reciprocating compressors are one of the most serious and expensive asset in the plant, these types of machines can provide higher compression ratio than similar axial or centrifugal compressors, however reciprocating compressors are more costly to maintain and suffering from high essential drawback. In spite of the criticality and importance of the reciprocating compressor, they are sometimes unobserved by condition monitoring team simply because their typical and primary PDM tool (FFT portable vibration analyser) which is routinely used on rotating equipment is not well suited for reciprocating machines. They have been unsuccessfully monitoring the reciprocating machines for many years, therefore the overall machine health is frequently ignored and not diagnosed correctly until damage occurs and it became too late to save the machine from failure.  In the same time, experience and statistical studies show that reciprocating compressors also consume times as maintenance cost of counterpart centrifugal or axial machines in the plant, consequently many companies spend more money on maintenance, repair and down times than it would cost to predict failure and eliminate the root cause on these critical machines. That approach could allow for maintenance to plan their activities around CBM rather than follow run to failure strategy.
The main goal of Reliability and condition monitoring team is not only to protect their reciprocating machines from catastrophic failure by using tradition protection system and vibration overall trending, but also predict, diagnose any abnormality in the equipment and sustain reliability which could be achieved by monitoring all machine components simultaneously, recording the performance, operation parameters, suitable vibration software, overall health, and lubrication as well.
Reciprocating compressor condition monitoring systems must achieve the level of condition monitoring that centrifugal equipment users have implemented for decades.
Takeaways
-Reciprocating compressor design and advantage
-Understand the nature of forces in a Reciprocating machine
-Reciprocating compressor failure modes and maintenance cost
-Reciprocating compressors monitoring in API 670
-Reciprocating compressor Diagnostics and best practices

A professional Reliability and condition monitoring Expert, I have more than 12 years’ experience in Reliability solutions, condition monitoring ,Lubrication Program and Rotor dynamics for rotating equipment across a diverse range of industries such as gas production/liquefaction (LNG), petrochemicals,refinery,Fertilizer,Ammonia,Miningandgas,powerStations.

STREAM 1

Case Study: How the emergence of “Fault Visualisation” as a diagnostic and analysis tool has helped us see and understand the behaviour of bad actors

Andrew Gale, Technical Director, Optical Motion Technologies

Visualisation is key to determining faults in machinery, infrastructure, and human performance. You can look at numbers and analysis from tools like accelerometers, strain gauges and modelling software and still not be able to visualise what the problem is. Sometimes just being able to see what is happening can change your perspective completely and allow for a more targeted and cost effective approach to fault analysis. Three case examples will be presented of how the emergence of “Fault Visualisation” as a diagnostic and analysis tool has helped us see and understand the behaviour of bad actors.

Andrew is a professional consultant and manager with over 30 years experience in the provision of Predictive Maintenance (PdM) Technologies and Services to the Industrial Maintenance sector.  Industry exposure includes: Mining, Food & Beverage, Steel & Aluminium, Petrochemical, Oil & Gas, Power Generation, Pulp & Paper, Automotive, Transportation, Cementation, Building Service and General Manufacturing.

Andrew’s qualifications and vocational experience include; Certificate of Technology (Mechanical), Diploma of Business, and Vibration Analyst VCATIII.

STREAM 2

Condition Monitoring Technologies

Alex Ashitey, Condition Monitoring Supervisor, AngloGold Ashanti Iduapriem Mine

Conditioning monitoring (CM) is an indispensable tool of any predictive maintenance system. In every successful industry, a concept of condition monitoring is employed to enhance reliability of machinery. As in every industry, there is business process flow normally term as “SIPOC” thus; System of operation, Input of raw materials, Processing of the raw materials, Output of the process and selling products to customers for revenue.
All these can only be achieved by integration of Predictive Maintenance (Condition Monitoring) techniques applied to both the industrial and transportation sections to ascertain and predicts machinery health conditions; these techniques include, Temperature Monitoring and Infrared Thermography (TMIT), Visual Inspections (VI), Lubrication Management and Oil Particulate Analysis (LMOA), Acoustic emission (Airborne Ultrasound), Vibration Analysis and diagnostics (VA), Ultrasound Testing (Material thickness/flaw testing), Model-based voltage and current systems (MBVI systems), Motor Condition Monitoring and Motor Current signature Analysis (MCMSA).
The use of condition monitoring techniques allows maintenance departments and field engineers to make decisions and schedule work and other actions to be taken The idea behind condition monitoring is to avoid the consequences of failure
Today, there are more than twenty (25) different types of non-intrusive Condition Monitoring (CM) techniques but the most broadly used technique for rotating machinery, however, is still vibration monitoring and this – linked to sophisticated data gathering and analysis systems – forms the basis for many of today’s CM programmes.
Takeaways
1. Types of Condition Monitoring Techniques
2. When to employ those techniques in the field of work and why
3. Benefits derived from Condition Monitoring Techniques

I have completed a cooperative experience with a BSc (Hons) in Mechanical Engineering from Cape Coast Technical University, Affiliate to North Carolina, USA. Over nine (9) years of hard work, with satisfactory conduct, diligently adhering to work ethics, systems, operational procedures, and taking Occupational Health, Safety, Environmental policies at heart; as field condition monitoring engineer from grass-root Inspection, through resource development, training of field crew, and supervision of Condition Monitoring techniques and liaising by making engineering inputs with other engineering personnel and relevant stakeholders which promotes cost saving. I have previously worked with AngloGold Ashanti, Iduapriem Mine Ltd. as Total Fluid Management Champion (TFM), where I took responsibility to Perform periodic audit on lubrication management and conformance with site TFM program, Coordinate and schedule TFM training for plant personnel, Perform or assist in Root Cause Analysis of lubrication related failures and problems, Serve as a representative at maintenance, operations, safety or other meetings where significant decision regarding lubrication are made and Identify hazards and initiate process of rectifying them I acted the role as Condition Monitoring Supervisor with the following responsibilities, Ensure thermography inspections are carried out on Overhead Power Lines & Substations, Switchgears, Distribution Boards and Fuse Boards, Ensure by carrying out precision alignment on machinery drive trains, Ensure stroboscopic inspection on Open Gear Lubrication (OGL) system, Collect and analyze vibration data on Mill Drive Trains, Ensure Ultrasonic thickness test on materials, Sample and analyze oil and fuel and initiate the process of rectifying the contamination

STREAM 2

HD Technology - A low RPM case, 3 years pre-warning time

Tim Sundstrom, Manager of Strategic Sales & Application, SPM Instrument
In this case study we will follow a bearing from the earliest damage indication to a severe damage during three years. The presentation will cover the basic concept of HD Technology and how the HD technology can extend the pre-warning time dramatically.
The bearing is rotating continuously with a relatively low speed (16 RPM). The presented application is from a fertilizer plant and is one of the absolutely most critical application found in this operation. An innovative tool to show information from several hundred spectrums in one picture will be demonstrated among other advanced tools.

Tim Sundström, born 1964 in Sweden, has a M.Sc. degree in Applied Physics and Electrical Engineering from Linköping University, Sweden. For over twenty years, he has been specializing in electronics development and has held managerial positions in the field since 1992. In 2001, he joined SPM Instrument as head of Research and Development, where he has been deeply involved in SPM HD development and field evaluations.

STREAM 1

Enhance predictive maintenance philosophy through effective vibration monitoring program

Narendra Murthy, Chief Executive Officer, Shobhan Vibration Consultancy

Vibration Analysis as a reliable tool for understanding health of rotating machines is a well known fact. However, a systematic implementation of vibration monitoring program can give much more information and enhance  predictive maintenance philosophy of any process plant or complex. In today’s competitive environment, the ultimate goal for any organization is to attain highest plant reliability at lowest possible cost. Using the guiding principles listed below, this presentation discusses improvements to vibration monitoring using practical examples.
Good engineering and vibration monitoring practice calls for coordination with  concerned departments to decide which machines are to be included in the vibration monitoring program and frequency of monitoring. This is a dynamic process requiring periodic feedback.  It is necessary to generate vibration reports which include maximum details about the machine, brief history of the problem encountered, discussion on the probable causes and finally corrective measure/s. Established standards for alert and danger levels of machines can be relied on in the beginning of machine’s life cycle. However, history of all machines should be used to establish more reliable vibration limits later on, which is essential to mitigate unwanted stoppage and maintenance of machines. Vibration engineer should carry out analysis based on certain data such as history, process issues etc. It is important to use an elimination process to provide precise corrective measures instead of several possible solutions. Additional tools such as phase and oil analysis will help narrow down the root cause.
It is a good practice to additionally release periodic reports in a standard format highlighting the overall status of machines in the complex under normal, alert or danger category. This report can be forwarded to the management to get an idea at a glance. Based on history, carry out ABC analysis to arrive at problematic machines and dominant failure modes which will enable maintenance department to efficiently plan and mitigate failures. Secondly, establishes PF intervals to assist production  department to optimally plan and hand over the machines for maintenance considering all factors. Carries out field balancing wherever possible to save time and money. Generate notification in CMMS system along with reports so that the job is carried out as recommended and history is available.

Takeaways
1. How to generate clear cut recommendation reports through process of elimination
2. How to apply logic in arriving at root cause of high vibrations
3. How to relate history with P-F curves and ABC analysis

B.Sc Engineering degree holder with more than 36 years experience in the field of predictive maintenance and vibration analysis. Worked in reputed petrochemical companies in India, Kuwait and Saudi Arabia in Reliability and Condition Monitoring departments. Holding Category 3 vibration analyst certificate as well as CMRP.

STREAM 2

How Digitalization and Machine Learning Can Advance the Vibration Analysis

Paulo Cipriano, Global CBM Services CoE Manager, SKF Australia Pty

This presentation provides a new approach in the field of vibration analysis that aims to improve efficiency and accuracy of data analysis to produce diagnostics and prognostics by introducing digitalisation and machine learning technologies. The principal goal on the utilisation of digitalisation and machine learning technologies associated with vibration data is to automate the identification of incipient failures and recommendation of maintenance actions to improve the usage and extend the life of the asset by predicting its future condition. In last past 20 years, several attempts have been made on trying to use alarms to automate the process of vibration analysis and diagnostics with the objective of improving efficiency, cost and performance but none has been successful. So, till today most vibration analysis data are manually reviewed. This manual evaluation of vibration data is inconsistent, time-consuming and an expensive task. The major part of the study was done by quantifying the performance of the proposed approach on the generation of “false positive alarm” (machine is good, but alarm is raised), “false negative alarm” (machine is defect, but no alarm is raised), “true positive alarm” (machine is defect and alarm is raised) and “true negative alarm” (machine is good and no alarm is raised). The proposed method was applied to real vibration and repair data from several asset types. One of the most important result achieved in this study was a reduction between 70 to 80% of time spent on vibration data analysis. New technologies such as digitalisation and machine learning have the potential to automate the complex process of vibration analysis entirely and at the same time use this data in correlation with others to predict the remaining life or reliability of assets in real-time and consequently cause a significant impact on the asset management program.
Takeaways
– New approach to vibration data analysis
– Introduction to machine learning
– Potential benefits of digitalization and machine learning

Joined SKF in 2000. Was responsible for the creation and set up of the first SKF’s Remote Diagnostic Center in 2002. Worked in different positions related to condition-based maintenance (CBM) services and integrated service solutions in South America, Asia and SKF Global. Over 20 years of experience in CBM services. Responsible for SKF’s Global CBM Service Standards. These standards outline the know-how for local capability set-up and delivery of CBM Services. The standardization helps SKF to maximize efficiency, safety, repeatability and quality while enabling SKF Digitalization program.

STREAM 3

Predictive Maintenance for the Masses

Paul Klimuc, Technical and Customer Service Manager, SDT

The popularity of ultrasound inspection for maintenance and reliability managers is attributed to ease of use, versatility, and low implementation cost. Once considered a companion to core predictive technologies like vibration analysis and infrared imaging, the emergence of standalone ultrasound inspection programs is more prevalent for reliability departments today. Ultrasound is now considered a front-line defense system in the everyday battle for manufacturing uptime. Airborne Ultrasound is Predictive Maintenance for the Masses.

The applications for which Ultrasonic technology can be used are nearly limitless, which lends to its mass appeal. Compressed air and exotic gas leak detection, condition-based monitoring of bearings, and acoustic lubrication of bearings, are popular applications. Some inspectors monitor thousands of steam traps and pinpoint in-leakage to boilers, condensers, and heat exchangers. Others marry ultrasonic inspection and infrared scanning together for added safety to MCC panel scans or surveys of high voltage substations and T&D lines.

In this presentation, these applications will be reviewed, and some demonstration will be used to help illustrate ultrasonic capabilities.

STREAM 1

Enhance predictive maintenance philosophy through effective vibration monitoring program

Narendra Murthy, Chief Executive Officer, Shobhan Vibration Consultancy

Vibration Analysis as a reliable tool for understanding health of rotating machines is a well known fact. However, a systematic implementation of vibration monitoring program can give much more information and enhance  predictive maintenance philosophy of any process plant or complex. In today’s competitive environment, the ultimate goal for any organization is to attain highest plant reliability at lowest possible cost. Using the guiding principles listed below, this presentation discusses improvements to vibration monitoring using practical examples.
Good engineering and vibration monitoring practice calls for coordination with  concerned departments to decide which machines are to be included in the vibration monitoring program and frequency of monitoring. This is a dynamic process requiring periodic feedback.  It is necessary to generate vibration reports which include maximum details about the machine, brief history of the problem encountered, discussion on the probable causes and finally corrective measure/s. Established standards for alert and danger levels of machines can be relied on in the beginning of machine’s life cycle. However, history of all machines should be used to establish more reliable vibration limits later on, which is essential to mitigate unwanted stoppage and maintenance of machines. Vibration engineer should carry out analysis based on certain data such as history, process issues etc. It is important to use an elimination process to provide precise corrective measures instead of several possible solutions. Additional tools such as phase and oil analysis will help narrow down the root cause.
It is a good practice to additionally release periodic reports in a standard format highlighting the overall status of machines in the complex under normal, alert or danger category. This report can be forwarded to the management to get an idea at a glance. Based on history, carry out ABC analysis to arrive at problematic machines and dominant failure modes which will enable maintenance department to efficiently plan and mitigate failures. Secondly, establishes PF intervals to assist production  department to optimally plan and hand over the machines for maintenance considering all factors. Carries out field balancing wherever possible to save time and money. Generate notification in CMMS system along with reports so that the job is carried out as recommended and history is available.

Takeaways
1. How to generate clear cut recommendation reports through process of elimination
2. How to apply logic in arriving at root cause of high vibrations
3. How to relate history with P-F curves and ABC analysis

B.Sc Engineering degree holder with more than 36 years experience in the field of predictive maintenance and vibration analysis. Worked in reputed petrochemical companies in India, Kuwait and Saudi Arabia in Reliability and Condition Monitoring departments. Holding Category 3 vibration analyst certificate as well as CMRP.

STREAM 2

Industrial Gearboxes - Designed for Life?

Steve Stratton, Service Specialist, Siemens

Today’s market conditions demand quality and longevity, but this has to be balanced against costs in a very competitive market. How do gearbox manufacturers decide the capacity and size of the gearbox and its components and how long they will last for at a certain market cost. Why are gearboxes much smaller now than they were in days gone by, what has changed to allow this downsizing? What we did in the past to ensure reliability was build it with a very high service factor (this can have an opposite effect though!) and then basically run our equipment to failure. Then we learned about the importance of maintenance but equipment still failed unexpectedly until we discovered the black art of condition monitoring! Of course CM cannot prevent every single failure but combined with good old fashioned maintenance and state of the art design and testing we are in a much better position regarding reliability than we were say 30 years ago. As an OEM we also like to think about the P-F curve or specifically Prior to the P-F curve and what can be done here to gain even higher reliability standards. Good examples of this would be better materials and heat treatment, better bearing designs or treatments, better lubrication, better installation…….the list is endless, but again we have to keep cost in mind. A gearbox could no doubt be built to last forever in theory but we may give our sales people a mammoth task selling it when its 5 X the market price as CAPEX usually takes precedence over OPEX these days!
Takeaways
1. Knowledge of gearbox manufacture and design.
2. What the OEM contributes to reliability of his product.
3. Basic gearbox maintenance and CM to improve its lifecycle.

Time served Mechanical Engineer. 1984 Apprenticeship at Renold Gears UK as a gearbox fitter, stint in the drawing office then Field Service technician. 1991 Moved to Boldypower Transmission company (Uk) as service technician including field service of all power transmission (Multi brand) products. 1995 joined Flender (UK) as part of International field service team, Servicing all industries but mainly steel, cement, Power generation (inc. wind) and railway applications travelling globally. 2005/6 BINDT ISO VA 1&2 certification plus our own CM in-house Certification program in our head office in Germany. By now most work focussed on fast growing wind industry particularly offshore and mostly Condition monitoring tasks. 2012 Moved to Flender (by now part of Siemens) Australia to introduce our CM offering here in the Iron Ore and coal Mines of Australia and to our sales and service teams. 2015 gained VA ISO III with Mobius but then moved into Service Sales Specialist role for all Winergy and Flender products, still retaining a CM and Technical product support function however. Today mostly focused in the wind portfolio as national business development/sales as this market grows rapidly in Australia.

STREAM 3

(RTT-CMS) Real Time Total Condition Monitoring System

Ali Izadi, Maintenance Analysis & Improvement Specialist, BHP Billiton

At one of the biggest BHP Billiton processing plants, we have, for some time now, successfully conducted full Condition Monitoring strategies on multiple equipment. More recently, we have been implementing a real-time Condition Monitoring system by connecting different measurement systems on equipment (such as Flow Rate, Speed, Elec-Current, etc.), resulting in a much more comprehensive and effective Condition Monitoring System. With real-time total Condition Monitoring, we have reduced our maintenance downtimes and cost to at or below the established benchmark level.

Takeaways

  • What are the benefits of Condition Based strategies compared to other type of maintenance strategies
  • How to justify Condition Based Strategy implementation
  • How to implement a robust Condition Based Strategy platform that last sustainable for long time
  • What is Real Time Total Condition Monitoring System
  • Is Real Time Total Condition Monitoring System suitable for everyone
  • How to optimise your current maintenance strategies and OEE in 6 months with minimum cost by help of Real Time Total Condition Monitoring System

Have worked over ten (10) years in wide range of industrial fields from Production Factories to Mine Sites, primarily in the field of Maintenance and Reliability Engineering. Solid history of providing reliability engineering support in driving improvements in assets’ performance through optimizing maintenance strategies and tactics, whilst undertaking a program of ongoing defect elimination.

Interactive Forum / Closing / Giveaways

Even though you can ask questions at the end of each presentation, there is nothing like an open discussion with your peers and the presenters of all of the sessions. Ask any question. Join in with the discussion. You may have an answer that will help someone else. In past conferences, attendees often get as much value from these open discussion forums as they do from the presentations themselves. If you don’t feel comfortable asking a question with the microphone, you can do it through the conference app anonymously. Either way, this is a great opportunity to have those nagging questions answered once and for all.